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My review of Game's album

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  • My review of Game's album

    Though 50 Cent is not nearly as artistically talented as Eminem or Dr. Dre, he is clearly a better businessman than both of them. So when Game wasn't going very far on Dre's label, it was a smart move to sign him to the only proponent of the Shady/Aftermath/G-Unit family that markets new artists with consistant success. Though Game and 50 Cent recently had a falling out, followed by a reconciliation that prevented a possibly violent downfall of the Interscope rap trinity's empire but didn't necessarily reunite the two, their short-lived alliance achieved the goal it was formed for in the first places: to expand 50's influence (and his pockets of course) and introduce Game to the world.

    The Game's debut, The Documentary, is a treat for any fan of West Coast hip hop. He dedicates a good portion of his album to immortalizing artists like Ice Cube, 2Pac, his hero Eazy E, and of course his mentor Dr. Dre. But he also makes it clear that he holds New York in high regard, shouting out Nas, Jay-Z (though he had a misunderstanding with Hova that could have escalated to a beef, which was later settled), and the late Notorious B.I.G. Like 50 Cent, his style is ambigious and it's hard tell where he's from unless he mentions it (as opposed to W.C. or Jadakiss for example). Unlike the warring East and West Coast hip hop heads back in '95 and '96, The Game makes it a point never to let pride in his city degenerate into petty sectionalism.

    Big name producers like Dre, Eminem, Timbaland, and Kanye West as well as lesser-knowns contribute consistantly good beats here. And Game, with his stellar flow and above-average lyricism, does not let these beats go to waste. But more important than his skills as an MC is the fact that he often actually has something to say. Though he idolizes gangsta rap pioneer Eazy-E, his content is closer to 2Pac's brand of more introspective, less misogynistic gangsta rap. Unlike his Compton hero and his Queens-native boss (at the time this record was recorded), his persona is more that of a troubled, disadvantaged kid turned tough than a vicious sociopath. He often talks about guns and bitches, but also about how he is a dedicated family man who has no problem respecting a woman who respects herself. The last thing we need is another 2Pac imitation, but unlike many rappers these days, it is Game's complex and tortured attitude that resembles the slain rap legend rather than his style.

    Much of the criticism leveled at Game is the same complaint people have about Jay-Z, that he talks about his favorite rappers and repeats lyrics from their hit songs too much. These critics miss the point that one of the main themes of The Documentary is hip hop nostalgia. Thus, lack of originality is not really a problem here. But while the album is devoid of pure filler, it not quite on the same level of the hip hop classics he mentions on the title song's chorus. But it does manage to be the best big label hip hop record released in years, and that's pretty impressive for a debut.

    4.5/5
    "The world is changing and there are new opportunities for those who are ready to join forces with those who are stronger and more experienced" -Lucky Luciano (1897-1962)

  • #2
    Originally posted by Lucky Luciano
    Though 50 Cent is not nearly as artistically talented as Eminem or Dr. Dre, he is clearly a better businessman than both of them. So when Game wasn't going very far on Dre's label, it was a smart move to sign him to the only proponent of the Shady/Aftermath/G-Unit family that markets new artists with consistant success. Though Game and 50 Cent recently had a falling out, followed by a reconciliation that prevented a possibly violent downfall of the Interscope rap trinity's empire but didn't necessarily reunite the two, their short-lived alliance achieved the goal it was formed for in the first places: to expand 50's influence (and his pockets of course) and introduce Game to the world.

    The Game's debut, The Documentary, is a treat for any fan of West Coast hip hop. He dedicates a good portion of his album to immortalizing artists like Ice Cube, 2Pac, his hero Eazy E, and of course his mentor Dr. Dre. But he also makes it clear that he holds New York in high regard, shouting out Nas, Jay-Z (though he had a misunderstanding with Hova that could have escalated to a beef, which was later settled), and the late Notorious B.I.G. Like 50 Cent, his style is ambigious and it's hard tell where he's from unless he mentions it (as opposed to W.C. or Jadakiss for example). Unlike the warring East and West Coast hip hop heads back in '95 and '96, The Game makes it a point never to let pride in his city degenerate into petty sectionalism.

    Big name producers like Dre, Eminem, Timbaland, and Kanye West as well as lesser-knowns contribute consistantly good beats here. And Game, with his stellar flow and above-average lyricism, does not let these beats go to waste. But more important than his skills as an MC is the fact that he often actually has something to say. Though he idolizes gangsta rap pioneer Eazy-E, his content is closer to 2Pac's brand of more introspective, less misogynistic gangsta rap. Unlike his Compton hero and his Queens-native boss (at the time this record was recorded), his persona is more that of a troubled, disadvantaged kid turned tough than a vicious sociopath. He often talks about guns and bitches, but also about how he is a dedicated family man who has no problem respecting a woman who respects herself. The last thing we need is another 2Pac imitation, but unlike many rappers these days, it is Game's complex and tortured attitude that resembles the slain rap legend rather than his style.

    Much of the criticism leveled at Game is the same complaint people have about Jay-Z, that he talks about his favorite rappers and repeats lyrics from their hit songs too much. These critics miss the point that one of the main themes of The Documentary is hip hop nostalgia. Thus, lack of originality is not really a problem here. But while the album is devoid of pure filler, it not quite on the same level of the hip hop classics he mentions on the title song's chorus. But it does manage to be the best big label hip hop record released in years, and that's pretty impressive for a debut.

    4.5/5

    This is good , therefore props

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