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Mao's government on the conditions of women in Chinese socialism (1972)

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  • Mao's government on the conditions of women in Chinese socialism (1972)


    P.L.A. women medical workers on Hainan Island prevent and cure diseases for Miao and Li poor and lower-middle peasants.

    In China, men and women are equal. The broad masses of working women are politically emancipated and economically independent. There is scarcely a field of work from which women are barred, the only exceptions being those that might injure their health. There are women machine-tool operators, geological prospectors, pilots, navigators, spray-painters, engineers and scientific researchers. Women are playing increasingly important roles in China's socialist revolution and socialist construction.

    Women also take direct part in managing state affairs. Communist Party and revolutionary committees at all levels, from the people's commune to the provincial and national bodies, all have women members. Women are elected to the National People's Congress and to membership on the Central Committee of the Chinese Communist Party.

    In New China, equal pay is given for equal work, as well as special protection for women workers. Women workers receive pre- and post-natal care free, and a 56-day maternity leave with full pay. Medical treatment is free of charge for both men and women workers, while their dependents pay half the regular fee. Many women workers have been sent to schools at various levels for systematic education. The retirement age for women industrial workers is 50, from which time they draw from 50 to 70 per cent of their wages as pension.

    None of this would have been conceivable before China's liberation in 1949. The old society gave women the lowest status. In addition to being exploited and oppressed by imperialism and bureaucrat-capitalism, they were subjected to the domination of the feudal systems of political authority, clan authority, religious authority and the authority of the husband.

    The establishment of the People's Republic of China in 1949 opened broad prospects for China's women to achieve emancipation.

    During the long years of armed struggle for nation-wide liberation, Chinese women of all nationalities in the revolutionary bases did their share. Some took a direct part in the fighting, others served in the army as couriers or medical workers. Those staying in the rear areas joined the men in production in support of the front, stood sentry, maintained public order, made clothing and shoes for armymen, and sent their sons or husbands to join the army. Many women gave their lives for the revolutionary cause. Among these was the 14-year-old martyr Liu Hu-lan, who was beheaded by the Kuomintang reactionaries.

    The nation-wide land reform which followed the liberation was the first step in bringing about economic equality between men and women. Each got a share of the land, irrespective of sex or age, freeing the hundreds of millions of landless and land-poor peasants from feudal landlord oppression. For the first time in history the women in China's villages had their own names on land title deeds.

    After the land reform, the peasants actively responded to Chairman Mao's call to organize mutual-aid teams and, following that, agricultural producer co-operatives. Production rose steadily. More and more women participated in farm work, in some places half of the women joining in collective labour. This raised their social status considerably.

    The adoption of the Marriage Law in 1950 emancipated women from a centuries-old feudal system of bondage. The new law stipulated free choice of partner, monogamy, equal rights for both sexes and protection of the legitimate interests of women and children. It has done much to foster the building of a new society in which women are the equal partners of men.

    Women's emancipation entered a new historical stage in China during the Great Leap Forward of 1958, when the country's agricultural and industrial production rose to new heights. Tens of millions of housewives stepped out of their homes to join in socialist construction. The forming of rural people's communes with a diversified economy, extensive irrigation projects and industry opened to women much wider fields of work. Women were trained to operate modern farm tools, machines and tractors, and served as technicians in water conservancy, forestry, fishing and meteorology.

    In the cities, housewives set up and worked in small factories that were mushrooming everywhere. This was followed by the establishment of public dining-rooms, nurseries, kindergartens and other services by the factories and enterprises or neighbourhood committees to relieve working women of household chores. Children can stay in the nurseries or kindergartens by the day, or live there throughout the week and be fetched home on Saturday afternoon to spend the weekend with their parents. Many neighbourhood committees run service centres where laundry, tailoring, mending and many other jobs are done for working women.

    Engels said: "The emancipation of women and their equality with men are impossible and must remain so as long as women are excluded from socially productive work and restricted to housework, which is private. The emancipation of women becomes possible only when women are enabled to take part in production on a large, social scale, and when domestic duties require their attention only to a minor degree." The experience of Chinese women in 1958 began their understanding of how to emancipate themselves completely.

    Chinese women now work, study, rest and take part in political and cultural activities along with the men. Many women have emerged as socialist-minded and professionally expert cadres. Instead of having their vision confined within the four walls of their homes as in the past, they now concern themselves with affairs of state and of the world. Enthusiastic, bold and devoted to the people, they are accomplishing feats China's women could not dream of before.

    Chairman Mao says: "Times have changed, and today men and women are equal. Whatever men comrades can accomplish, women comrades can too."

    In Kwangchow, a group of young women electricians who had previously worked only on the ground are now doing maintenance work on 220,000-volt ultra-high-tension transmission lines without interruption of power, nimbly climbing the 30-metre pylons to change porcelain insulators.

    The West District No.1 Transistor Equipment Factory in Peking is one of the neighbourhood factories. Its predecessor was a small workshop for repairing scales, formed in 1958 by merging several handicraft co-operatives. Eighty of its 100 workers were housewives. It had no technicians and was set up with only two old machine tools and a table drilling machine. Now, with 300 workers, the factory produces various types of electronic equipment.

    A Taching oil extracting team of young women intellectuals, helped by veteran workers, is doing a good job of oilfield management after two years' practice. In Heilungkiang Province, a women's bridge-building team, after a short period of training, completed in 70 days a 110-metre five-arch highway bridge in the depths of the Greater Khingan Mountains forest. Along with the men commune members, the "Iron Girls" team of Tachai Production Brigade in Shansi Province is building a prosperous socialist countryside by transforming a barren hilly region into fertile fields. Under the care of the Party, waifs who in the old society roamed the streets are among China's first generation of women pilots. Former Tibetan slaves have become good women cadres.

    All of this reflects the great political and economic change in the status of China's women today.

    During the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, China's women played a militant role together with the men, and this has brought about a still greater change in their outlook.

    To read the rest of New Women in China click
    Last edited by | K Y L E |; 04-12-2006, 06:42 AM.

  • #2
    A Liberated Woman Speaks - Lu Yu-lan *

    Lu Yu-lan out with poor and lower-middle peasants to hoe the fields. They go forward along the broad path of socialism.

    Tungliushanku Village in Linhsi County, Hopei Province, where I was born, was liberated in 1945 when I was a child of five, so I have grown up in the new society. I was able, like the boys of the village, to go to school, and completed the sixth grade. Then, resolved that a new, socialist countryside should be built in China, I worked in the farm collective and took part in revolutionary work.

    But I am far from being the only ordinary working woman of Linhsi County who has matured and become a leading cadre. Thirty per cent of the county Party and government cadres today are women, many of whomhold leading positions of responsibility at various levels. Our situation is indicative of the status of women in socialist, new China. Women manage state affairs along with the men; they have been freed politically.

    Changing Society and the Family
    Women's emancipation is not easy. A current, wrong idea was that women win their freedom simply by seizing control in the family, and this wrong idea led to a lot of fruitless quarrelling among husband, wife and in-laws. Lack of understanding on the relationship between raising women's position in the family and taking part in class struggle in society at large disrupted family harmony and failed to win public sympathy and achieve its aim.

    Then the Party organized the women to study what Chairman Mao says about women's emancipation: "Genuine equality between man and woman can be realized only in the process of socialist transformation of societyas a whole." Women began taking a broader view, to understand that to achieve their own emancipation they must look at things in terms of the entire society, to see the family as a basic social unit, as changing with the transformation of society as a whole. It was realized that after women take their position in society, changes in family relations follow, and men and women can be equal.

    I was already active in women's work in 1955, when I was 15. Chairman Mao called on China's peasants to organize co-ops, and I went to the poor and lower-middle peasants' homes to discuss the question. Soon we set up our agricultural producers' co-operative. I also encouraged women to take part in collective productive labour outside the household, and opposed the old idea still held by a few that "men go to the county town, but women's place is in the home." These few people with old thinking did not want women to take their place in society, and they forbade the women in their families to do collective work.

    One instance was that of a bride whose parents-in-law insisted on the old ways, and wouldn't allow her out of the yard. I used to take my sewing basket and visit this young woman in the evenings. While learning needlework from her, I would talk about women's emancipation. Once I said, "Won't it be fine when women go out and work, when both men and women are co-op members!" The young woman agreed, and before long she was working along with the others. She worked. well, and at the same time had her income in the family. Soon she had won over her husband and his parents, while other young women followed her, also finding their way out of the four walls of their homes.

    We women went from there into wider fields. A dozen or so of us organized a "March 8th"* tree-planting team. We had no saplings, as we had not yet a tree nursery, so we would walk for miles in a day collecting tree seeds. In three years we had over 110,000 trees planted on more than 20 hectares of sandy wasteland. By 1971, we women, whose labour force was augmented by that of the poor and lower-middle peasants of our village, had planted more than a million timber and fruit trees, covering 220 hectares of sandy land with green. This checked wind and shifting sand, and we began to have good harvests every year. Our grain yields increased in some cases by as much as 650 per cent. The old view of women's "place" underwent a change, and people were saying, "The women are really doing their share of the collective work!"

    * Lu Yu-lan has served as chairman of an agricultural producers' co-operative and as Party branch secretary of a people's commune production brigade. She attended the Ninth National Congress of the Chinese Communist Party in 1969, where she was elected a Party Central Committee member. Now, at the age of 32, Comrade Lu is Secretary of the Linhsi County Party Committee and Deputy Secretary of the Hopei Provincial Party Committee.

    Comment


    • #3
      Chinese propaganda is probably the funniest out of all the communist countries.. It's always a picture of some person out in the field with a shovel over their shoulder and a railroad hat on posing in front of some red sunset.

      Last edited by w.i.m.; 04-12-2006, 09:26 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        ^^ i read a bit of that red book Mao is holding when i was at the Hong Kong airport, any1 else read it? a very interesting book.

        ps:is it comunism in hong kong? i saw all these heavily armed soldiers at the airport.
        Originally posted by FunkySuicideGirl
        Ima sucker when some suck my lip or bite in it
        Originally posted by Syko Squidge
        ^
        fuck off you gay piece of cunt
        Originally posted by Otto
        That shit is fuck,

        Comment


        • #5
          There was never communism in Hong Kong.. It was controlled by Britain.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by whereismarshall
            Chinese propaganda is probably the funniest out of all the communist countries.. It's always a picture of some person out in the field with a shovel over their shoulder and a railroad hat on posing in front of some red sunset.


            I would hardly call it funny. Chinese propaganda and agitation is excellent and is more varied than you are letting on.


            Here's a good Mao poster you might not of seen, since we're on the subject.


            Franc: Mao's Little Read Book is more popular than the Judeo-Christian filth "the Bible". It is far more educating and worthwhile than that nonsense as I hope you will agree.
            Attached Files

            Comment


            • #7
              Here's one of my favorite socialist paintings.


              "Marching in Step Leads to Victory. : (Chairman Mao promulgating in 1928 the Three Main Rules of Discipline and the Eight Points for Attention to the Chinese Red Army in Shatien, Kueitung County, Hunan Province.) : by Kao Hung, Peng Pin and Ho Kung-teh"

              Comment


              • #8
                It was good being a women, unless you criticized Mao's shitty plans, then you dead bitch!
                Originally posted by ethan20
                There's a correlation between cervixal cancer in women and un-circumsized penises. Not to mention it almost cuts your bacteria count on the penis in half.
                Originally posted by reservoirGod
                Ethan sure does know alot about dicks

                Comment


                • #9
                  My cousin told me that people had to carry around his red book and they had to quote from the book in every day conversation. Like before they bought something they'd say a quote from the book haha

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Isn't Mao the one who took V-Cards from 12 year old peasant girls?
                    http://www.thereligionofpeace.com/

                    “if somebody (a Muslim) discards his religion, kill him” (Bukhari, vol. 4, bk. 52, no. 260).

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