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  • Official New Orleans Thread

    Sticky this and have all updates put in here. Since theres like a 20 threads about it currently....

    http://video.msn.com/v/us/v.htm?mkt=...cane%20Katrina

    ^video of the flood

    http://video.msn.com/v/us/v.htm?g=73...f57324dac311&f
    ^Chaos erupts amid New Orleans’ desperation
    As parts of hurricane-flooded New Orleans descended into anarchy Thursday, storm victims were raped and beaten, fights and fires broke out, corpses lay out in the open, and rescue helicopters and law enforcement officers were fired on.



    Department of Homeland Screw-Up
    What is the Bush administration doing?

    The Bush administration has been staggeringly ineffectual in its response to the rapidly deteriorating situation in New Orleans. Its failures are painful evidence of how far we have to go in developing the capability to respond rapidly to a mass-casualty disaster.

    The president's statement this afternoon set the tone. Rather than direct the U.S. military to immediately assist the thousands of people without food or water in the city center, Bush assured the nation that expected gasoline shortages would be temporary and that his father and former President Clinton were ready to pass the tin can to ensure private-sector support for rebuilding New Orleans. As people began dying around the Convention Center, and Mayor Ray Nagin resorted to issuing a pathetic SOS over CNN, Homeland Security Chief Michael Chertoff spoke empathetically of the suffering of the people in New Orleans. But somehow he seemed proud that 72 hours after the hurricane hit, only 2,800 National Guardsmen had come to the city. The number is about to reach 12,000 by tomorrow. That is awfully late for the people stranded there. Yet Lt. Gen. Russel Honoré, who is commanding the military component of Washington's response, pleaded for patience from the people of New Orleans, promising that the U.S. Army was "building the capability" to help them.

    Building the capability? How is it possible that with the fourth anniversary of 9/11 almost upon us, the federal government doesn't have in hand the capability to prepare for and then manage a large urban disaster, natural or man-made? In terms of the challenge to government, there is little difference between a terrorist attack that wounds many people and renders a significant portion of a city uninhabitable, and the fallout this week from the failure of one of New Orleans' major levees. Indeed, a terrorist could have chosen a levee for his target. Or a dirty-bomb attack in New Orleans could have caused the same sort of forced evacuation we are seeing and the widespread sickness that is likely to follow.

    Chertoff's Department of Homeland Security demonstrated today that it could organize an impressive press conference in Washington, lining up every participating civilian or military service from the Coast Guard to the Federal Emergency Management Agency to promise its cooperation. But on the ground in Louisiana, where it counts, DHS is turning out to be the sum of its inefficient parts. The department looks like what its biggest critics predicted: a new level of bureaucracy grafted onto a collection of largely ineffectual under-agencies.

    What has DHS been doing if not readying itself and its subcomponents for a likely disaster? The collapse of a New Orleans levee has long led a list of worst-case urban crisis scenarios. The dots had already been connected. Over the last century, New Orleans has sunk 3 feet deeper below sea level. With each inch, pressure grows along the levees. Meanwhile the loss of wetlands and the shrinking of the Gulf Coast's barrier islands have reduced the natural protection from hurricane winds. The weakness of the levees was underscored in a 2002 wide-ranging exploration of New Orleans' hurricane vulnerability by the New Orleans Times-Picayune, one of many grimly vindicated Cassandras. The U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, which built the levees and continues to manage them, told the paper then that there was little threat of a levee's collapse. But the corps admitted that its estimates were 40 years old and that no one had bothered to update them.

    The response to Katrina thus far indicates two flaws in the Bush administration's thinking about homeland security. The federal government hasn't learned how to plan for a tragedy that demands putting a city on sustained life-support, as opposed to a one-moment-in-time attack that requires recovering the dead and injured from debris and then quickly rebuilding. And DHS appears unwilling to plan for the early use of the U.S. military to cope with a civilian tragedy. Presidential administrations have perennially underestimated the difficulty of the latter task. In 1962, President John F. Kennedy's top aide, Kenneth O'Donnell, thought it would be easy to deploy troops rapidly to defend James Meredith when he was attacked by segregationists while trying to enroll as the University of Mississippi's first black student. "If the President of the United States calls up and says, 'Get your ass down there,' " O'Donnell said, "I would think they'd be on a fucking plane in about five minutes." Kennedy made that call. But then, in spite of O'Donnell's prediction, he watched in frustration as the army dithered for hours before deploying to Oxford, Miss.

    The Kennedy administration thus learned that the army must be told in advance what to do. As a matter of law and preference, the military does little training for domestic missions. It balks and mutters about posse comitatus, the legal principle that prohibits the use of the army for law enforcement, and leaves the hard work for the National Guard and state and local authorities. This has made sense most of the time. But in an era when we are supposed to be better prepared for an urban disaster, the tradition of allowing local and state authorities to be overwhelmed before the federal government and military step in should have been rethought.

    Located only three hours from New Orleans is Fort Polk, home of the 4th Brigade of the 10th Mountain Division, a light infantry unit with about 3,000 soldiers. Also at Fort Polk is the Joint Readiness Training Center, which prepares military units to respond rapidly to crises abroad. The 4th Brigade has been training for duty in Afghanistan. Why was it also not ready to take on a local disaster scenario in hurricane season? Or at the least, once the National Hurricane Center predicted that the eye of Katrina would come close to New Orleans, couldn't DHS have deployed the military to help shore up the levees?

    And in the event of a WMD attack, when there would likely be no warning at all, what is DHS's contingency plan for moving into position the army or the marines to restore order and sustain life? In the wake of Katrina and the breached levee, the answer seems to be not much of one. In the wake of 9/11, that is worse than incomprehensible. It is unforgivable.

    http://slate.msn.com/id/2125494/?nav=ais
    Last edited by Head Phones; 09-01-2005, 10:47 PM.
    http://d12world.com/board/showthread...a2c42&t=247875

  • #2
    i think their not helping them, because their black and its an excuse to increase FEMAs budget

    bush
    http://msnbc.msn.com/id/9157866/

    WASHINGTON - President Bush will tour the hurricane-devastated Gulf Coast region on Friday and has asked his father, former President George H.W. Bush, and former President Clinton to lead a private fund-raising campaign for victims.

    “This is an agonizing time for the people of the Gulf Coast,” Bush said Thursday as he stood with the two former presidents in the White House and urged patience, saying relief is on the way.

    He asked Americans to be prudent in their consumption of energy but called the hurricane a “temporary disruption” to gasoline supplies. “Don’t buy gas if you don’t need it,” the president said.

    The Bush administration also intends to seek $10 billion to cover immediate relief needs, congressional officials said.

    “We’re united in our determination to help the good people who have been affected by this hurricane,” Bush said.

    Bush to tour in air, on ground
    The president will fly to Mobile, Ala., then survey the Alabama and Mississippi coast by helicopter before visiting some sites on the ground in Mississippi on Friday. He then plans to go to New Orleans for an aerial tour, said White House press secretary Scott McClellan.

    “Tomorrow’s visit is another way for the president to show the nation’s support and compassion for the victims and our appreciation for those who are helping with the ongoing rescue and recovery efforts,” McClellan said. “It is an opportunity for the president to get a first-hand, up-close look at the response and recovery efforts and to hear from those on the ground.”

    Bush got a higher-altitude view Wednesday when his plane, Air Force One, dropped several thousand feet to fly directly over the region during Bush’s flight from his Texas ranch back to Washington. McClellan said Bush wanted to get a closer look as soon as possible but didn’t go sooner because he didn’t want to disrupt emergency response efforts on the ground.

    Bush had said earlier Thursday that thousands more victims of Hurricane Katrina still need to be rescued and acknowledged the frustration of people who need food, water and shelter.

    Addressing the frustration
    “I fully understand people wanting things to have happened yesterday,” he said in a live interview in the Roosevelt Room of the White House with ABC’s “Good Morning America” program. “I understand the anxiety of people on the ground. ... So there is frustration. But I want people to know there’s a lot of help coming.”

    He said that while the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001 were a man-made disaster, the aftermath of Sept. 11 and Hurricane Katrina were “just as serious in both cases.”

    “New Orleans is more devastated than New York was,” Bush said.

    Bush has directed his staff to try to assess the economic affect of the storm as the administration prepares an emergency budget request for Congress. Bush was hearing his economic advisers’ preliminary estimate in the afternoon after a lunch with Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan.

    Emergency trumps estate tax debate
    Meantime, House and Senate Republican aides said that Congress was reconvening from its summer recess late Thursday or Friday to pass emergency legislation for victims of Hurricane Katrina.

    Ron Bonjean, spokesman for House Speaker J. Dennis Hastert, R-Ill., said Republicans had contacted Democrats about bringing the House back on Friday at noon to pass the emergency bill.

    Congress had been scheduled to reconvene next week after a long summer break, Democratic Leader Harry Reid earlier Thursday urged majority Republicans to drop plans to debate legislation repealing the estate tax in favor of hurricane-related relief.
    http://d12world.com/board/showthread...a2c42&t=247875

    Comment


    • #4
      my prayers go out to all persons involved in this disaster

      Comment


      • #5
        ^word idk but it seems like more people are gonna di from no help than they are from the actual flood
        http://d12world.com/board/showthread...a2c42&t=247875

        Comment


        • #6
          Canada has a specialty unit thats ment to deal with situtions just like this but its just sitting waiting for the american government to allow it into the country. They cant say that they have it all under control and that they dont need more help because cleary they need all the help they can get
          If I can kick drugs, I can deliver a baby

          Charlie RIP
          LOST

          Comment


          • #7
            the gov't should of done more to get people out....new orleans is so poor.....people had no means to get out of there.....the gov't has been talking about fixing the levy's (sp?) and stuff to get ready.....they couldn't handle cat 4 or 5.......when will we all learn???.....does every part of the east coast need to get by a hurricane to understand to get the fuck out of your house and evacuate??......these storms arent just good surfing waves anymore.....shits changed

            Comment


            • #8
              Originally posted by locality.
              the gov't should of done more to get people out....new orleans is so poor.....people had no means to get out of there.....the gov't has been talking about fixing the levy's (sp?) and stuff to get ready.....they couldn't handle cat 4 or 5.......when will we all learn???.....does every part of the east coast need to get by a hurricane to understand to get the fuck out of your house and evacuate??......these storms arent just good surfing waves anymore.....shits changed

              A year ago the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers proposed to study how New Orleans could be protected from a catastrophic hurricane, but the Bush administration ordered that the research not be undertaken. After a flood killed six people in 1995, Congress created the Southeast Louisiana Urban Flood Control Project, in which the Corps of Engineers strengthened and renovated levees and pumping stations.

              In early 2001, the Federal Emergency Management Agency issued a report stating that a hurricane striking New Orleans was one of the three most likely disasters in U.S., including a terrorist attack on New York City. But by 2003 the federal funding for the flood control project essentially dried up as it was drained into the Iraq war.

              Comment


              • #9
                glad we are wasting lives over in iraq.....bush doesnt care.....i hope america sees the racism in this shit.....i was surprised bush even said they could all go to his atsrodome

                Comment


                • #10
                  http://www.d12world.com/board/showthread.php?t=244775

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    i was surprised bush even said they could all go to his atsrodome
                    that shit made me laugh

                    i took too long to make this thread.......but the 'rescueing' is sloppy as fuck, what are they doing besides the bus thing??
                    http://d12world.com/board/showthread...a2c42&t=247875

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      http://www.d12world.com/board/showthread.php?t=244458

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        the kkk is sittin up in thier trailers laughin thier asses off right now : /

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          http://www.d12world.com/board/showthread.php?t=244818
                          http://www.d12world.com/board/showthread.php?t=244736

                          check out www.infowars.com theirs a bunch of pages about this

                          Ivan and Katrina

                          These are both very Russian sounding names. It has been established that the former Soviet Union (fSU) developed and boasted of weather modification technology during the 1960's and 70's with deployment against the United States coming in 1976 with the audible arrival of the woodpecker grid. These weather operations continue to this day.

                          http://www.infowars.com/articles/sci...ed_katrina.htm

                          NASA Funds Weather Modification Technology

                          For 25 years, Ross Hoffman has had a vision: to use tiny changes in the environment to alter the paths of hurricanes, slow down snow storms and turn dark days bright.

                          For most of those years, Hoffman kept his ideas largely to himself. His adviser at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology told him weather control was too outlandish for his Ph.D. thesis. The chances of a buttoned-down foundation or government agency funding such research were so slim, Hoffman didn't even bother to ask.

                          But, in 2001, all that changed. Hoffman stumbled upon a tiny, obscure cranny of the American space program -- the NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts, or NIAC. In this $4 million-a-year agency, Hoffman found a place where the wildest of ideas were not only tolerated, they were welcome.

                          Shape-shifting space suits? Step right up. Antimatter-powered probes to Alpha Centauri? No problem. Robotic armada to destroy incoming asteroids? Pal, just sign on the dotted line. Weather control seemed downright down to earth in comparison.

                          Hoffman is now wrapping up his half-million-dollar study for NIAC. But the agency is continuing to bankroll concepts for a future decades away.

                          Some space analysts wonder how long it can last, however. With NASA in turmoil, and a presidential directive to return to the moon, will a science fiction-oriented agency like NIAC survive?

                          "They're interested in taking some risks, unlike most other government organizations these days," said Hoffman, a vice president at Atmospheric and Environmental Research in Lexington, Massachusetts. "At NIAC, if it's not risky, it's not going to get funded."

                          Over the last six years, NIAC has backed 118 studies into the chanciest of propositions: interplanetary rapid transit, aircraft without moving parts, and radio signals bounced off of meteors' trails.

                          The idea, according to NIAC director Robert Cassanova, is to give concepts 10 to 40 years out a chance to grow, and then to pass those models on to NASA proper for further development.

                          The agency's best-known baby is the so-called space elevator -- a 62,000-mile twine of carbon nanotubes that would transport cargo into orbit.

                          Technically, NIAC isn't part of the space agency, Cassanova said. It's a wing of the Universities Space Research Association -- a collection of colleges that work together on final-frontier studies. Through the group, NASA gives Cassanova a few million a year to hand out to way-out researchers. NIAC hands out two types of grants. Six-month Phase I investigations receive $75,000 each. Phase II grants go up to $400,000, for 18 to 24 months of study.

                          With his award, Hoffman tweaked a weather-prediction program to show that moving a hurricane was possible -- at least in theory. Here's how: You need a ring of satellites in orbit, channeling the sun's energy, stretching around the Earth. The machines would beam power to the planet, using microwaves. But, tuned to 183 GHz, they could also heat up small regions of the atmosphere by a degree or two. Those small changes could have enormous impact, Hoffman's simulation showed. A deadly hurricane, headed for the Hawaiian island of Kauai, drifted off into the Pacific, harmlessly.

                          "One of the great things about NIAC is that they never say, 'That's crazy, you can never build a fleet of solar-powered space stations,'" Hoffman said.

                          Such a system is decades off -- if it ever happens at all. But analysts like Brian Chase, vice president of the Space Foundation, see research like Hoffman's as critically important.

                          "It's impossible to make breakthroughs if all you're funding is immediate, near-term applications," he said.

                          Chase is concerned, however, that NASA may be pressured to drop its far-out studies.

                          "These are tight times," he said. "It's tricky balancing how much can be obtained for the moon and Mars versus how much can be obtained for the longer-term stuff. Often, it's one of the first areas to get cut."

                          NIAC isn't the only arm of the space agency engaged in projects that border on the fantastic. The Marshall Space Flight Center, for example, is looking at propelling spaceships with electrodynamic tethers (PDF). But Marshall can be pretty darn practical, compared to the NIAC folks.

                          Marshall research asks, "How long can I store antimatter?" said Gerry Jackson, president of Hbar Technologies in West Chicago, Illinois. NIAC studies wonder, "How do I integrate it into spacecraft? How does this affect mission priorities? And how many kilograms can I get to Alpha Centauri in a certain number of years?"

                          Jackson said Marshall scientists are trapping antimatter a fraction of a billionth of a gram at a time. By his NIAC-funded calculations, a trip to Alpha Centauri will require 17 grams. He figures it would take 20 or 30 years to ramp up to harvesting tens of milligrams per year. And after that, it will only be another decade or so until there's enough antimatter for an Alpha Centauri trip.

                          So we had better start planning now.

                          http://www.infowars.com/articles/sci...ci_fi_tech.htm
                          http://d12world.com/board/showthread...a2c42&t=247875

                          Comment


                          • #15
                            Fox news was just interviewing a nurse on the phone and she said they don't even have food or water for themselves and no one has come there no federal gov. no local gov. and no police. She said the only people holding the hosptal together are the doctors and nurses who volunteered to stay. Then some woman from FEMA (I think) say's that's not true. Why the fuck would the nurse at the hospital lie?

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